our values

Jesuit Education: Why

“Jesuit schools should be places where people are believed in, honoured and cared for; where natural talents and creative abilities are recognised and celebrated; where individual contributions and accomplishments are appreciated; where everyone is treated fairly and justly; where sacrifice on behalf of the economically poor, the socially deprived, and the educationally disadvantaged is commonplace; where each of us finds the challenge, encouragement and support we need to reach our fullest individual potential for excellence; where we help one another and work together with enthusiasm and generosity, attempting to model concretely in word and action the ideals we uphold.”

Ignatian Pedagogy

Jesuit schools teach pupils to decide from the inside, from the depths of their hearts, and to serve generously. Young people are taught in such a way that they are not only academically skilled, but look on the world with empathy and devote at least some of their time, talent and energy to the benefit of others. They encourage faith in action – creating men and women for others for the greater glory of God and the common good.

Jesuit education places an emphasis on, and assists in, developing the role of each individual pupil as a member of the human community. Students, teachers and all within the community are encouraged to build a unity with others that goes beyond race, culture and religion.

The Ignatian Pedagogy presents the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm, a model for teaching and learning in Jesuit schools. This model identifies three key components of Jesuit teaching and learning:

  • Drawing on experience
  • Reflecting on that experience
  • The action that follows from learning

Jesuit education also stresses the importance of understanding the context in which teaching and learning takes place, and the need to constantly evaluate the power and value of what has been taught.

The criterion of excellence is applied to all areas of school life. The pursuit of academic excellence is appropriate in a Jesuit school, but only within the larger context of human excellence. The success of Jesuit education is measured not in terms of academic performance of students or professional competence of teachers, but rather in terms of this quality of life.